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Challenge Reflections.....

As the new month starts, another challenge ends. This time, though, I can honestly say I am glad. And, after 2 solid months of blogging/writing challenges, I'm relieved to have a break.

April's "A-Z Blogging Challenge" introduced me to a world of new friends and honed my creative skill by severely restricting my scope. When I first started A-Z, I underestimated the effort that would be needed to write a blog centered around a letter of the alphabet-- as I am one to attempt the "not-so-normal" when selecting a prospective word, the challenge began to tax my creative energies mid-way through the alphabet. But, with the help and encouragement of my new friends, I survived.

And, because I could feel the onset of anxiety at the prospect of A-Z being over, I charged head-long into May's "Story A Day". The concept of this challenge centers around writing 31 'stories' during the month of May, though it is relatively flexible as you set the rules for the event yourself (you just have to abide by your own rules). Mine were simple enough: 1/ write every day 2/ write at least 500 words

Before I started May's challenge, I gathered an extensive list of poisons, weapons, victim/character names, and motives--- I had it in my head to write a collection of mysteries with 2 main characters solving them. What I did not have in my head, was that the first story that I started back on May 1st would not finish until May 31st. No way did I plan to write 1 story during the month of May--- so, in a way, I feel like I cheated, but, then again.... I did write every day for at least 500 words, sometimes more.

May's challenge introduced me to serial writing. I have heard several veteran writers say they often leave their writing for the day undone. They stop before they've finished their thoughts, so they have some place to pick up the next morning. In a way, they save themselves the frustration of floundering for where to go next. After this challenge, I finally understand what that means. I didn't know where my story was going from one day to the next, but I always stopped just at the edge of the cliff-- just where I could see the hazy earth miles beneath my feet, but it was enough. When I sat down to write again, I knew right where I left off and let the story write itself out.

I do apologize to any that suffered their way through my May posts as they were horribly unedited and really just bare-bone chapters, but "Story A Day" was about getting the writing done and moving on.... the polishing will come later.

Did these challenges make me a better writer?
Would I do them again?

I give a hearty and resounding YES! to both questions.... I take away with me that discipline is important (i.e. writing EVERY DAY) and that sometimes, nay, most times, it doesn't have to be the greatest work you've written, but, you have to get the so-so work out of the way so your masterpiece can have a clear path!

Comments

  1. Congrats on completing both challenges. I wouldn't touch A-Z with a 10' pole, but I wound up enjoying STADA.

    Here's to new habits and abundant words to come!

    ReplyDelete
  2. You did a brilliant job. What errors? I was too involved in the story to notice any. I hope you have a good rest and I look forward to more of your posts.

    ReplyDelete
  3. @Janel--- Thanks! Really, A-Z wasn't too bad, I think I made it harder for myself than I needed to :-) Glad you made it through STADA, it really was fun :-)

    @Niki--- Aw, you're too kind! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete

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