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Possible Plots

Okay....so I can't decide which of the following to work on next :) Any help would be greatly appreciated :)

1/ Stolen Child--- Inspired by William Yeats' poem with the same name. It's still a bit fuzzy but I want it to be something along the lines of a dark myth. Set in an isolated area, a "cursed" water area is avoided by all locals except those who are "dared" to try and stay in the area alone--- dark Faery-people lure innocent humans to leave their own world behind, but every wonderful promise the faeries present is a lie. The true motive is to ensure the survival of the dark faery-people as each human they trick and kidnap then become dark faery-folk who are enslaved and forced to trick and kidnap other humans.

2/ Soul Sifters--- Okay, this might be a strange one to describe and it isn't intended to be religious or non-religious, just a creative "what if"--- One of the laws of thermodynamics is that "energy can neither be created nor destroyed only transferred or transformed". And if all thoughts, memories and mental processes are essentially "electrical energy"---neurons firing, etc., then what happens to that mental "electrical energy" when we die? Is the "energy" our soul? What about people whose "energies" don't work right? The geniuses, the mentally-deficient, multiple personalities, past-life memories. What if all the energies of our minds are connected and when someone dies, their energy is transferred into the "energy pool" waiting to be shared/transferred into a newly-born vessel. Essentially the energies are supposed to "Sifted" of their past living vessel...only sometimes it doesn't work properly---which explains the individuals whose energies don't work right.

3/ Poe's Poetry--- This is intended as a tribute to Poe. It will be set in 2009, the 200-yr anniversary of Poe's birth. There has been more mystery surrounding Poe's life and death than almost any other poet. There is still a question as to whether or not Poe was actually murdered and that he didn't actually die in a drunken stupor. An aspiring poet, who has been likened to Poe, has been putting out such strikingly similar poetry, which most believe could only be produced by the master himself, that some people are wondering whether the aspiring poet is channeling Poe himself. When strange events start happening, that are eerily identical to the dark happenings in Poe's poetry, one is forced to ask if someone is trying to prevent the new Poe from rising to the dark master's height. But why? Are they afraid the truth will be known? And what about the nearly identical poetry style? Is it possible that Poe has come back to expose the truth?

Soooo, which one is most intriguing? I haven't started any of them officially, the plots are still spinning in my head, but I'd appreciate any help :)

Comments

  1. That middle one is totally mental! Sounds great though, very ambitious.

    "Stolen Child" is that nether-world that you like to inhabit!

    "Poe's Poetry" - interesting. And you have a ready-made back story too.

    Well I'm sure you'd make a good hack of all of them but I'd be most intrigued probably by "2".

    Energy *fizzle* *snarl*

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  2. lol...I like Graham's take on it. I like '2' as well. It seems that you can get a lot of people's minds spinning on that one. You'd also have readers arguing about the subject, which should be the ultimate compliement as a writer right? lol
    I like '3' too. I would really like to see that one come round eventually because it looks like you should start with '2' and move onto '3'.
    Love it!

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